Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme

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  1. 2019
  2. Risk frames and multiple ways of knowing: Coping with ambiguity in oil spill risk governance in the Norwegian Barents Sea

    The opening of new areas for offshore drilling in the Arctic is highly controversial. As ice cover in the region is melting at an alarming rate, new areas have been opened for petroleum industry in the Norwegian Barents Sea. Our qualitative analysis examines risks related to the petroleum operations in the newly opened areas and provides insight into the complex and socially constructed nature of the risks. With the use of visual influence diagram- based mental modelling approach, we demonstrate the multiple ways in which the risks are understood and defined. We also analyse the type of knowledge that the risk frames are based on. The influence diagrams present the risk frames in a clear, visual, form. The study indicates that the existing governance framework fails to treat the ambiguity around oil spill risks: the current risk assessments and risk management do not reflect on the multiple ways in which the participants in this study 1) frame the problem situation, 2) how they identify different measures to manage risks, and 3) what are considered as key knowledge needs and knowledge producers by the participants. We suggest that social learning and collaborative knowledge production are needed to move towards developing shared understanding of the problem situation. Finally, we suggest that the rigorous examination and the unveiling of ambiguity may help developing deliberative risk governance measures and moving towards sustainability transformations.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Fisheries and Environmental Management Group, Marine risk governance group, Creative adaptation to wicked socio-environmental disruptions (WISE STN), Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Environmental Sciences, Staff Services
    ContributorsParviainen, T., Lehikoinen, A., Kuikka, S., Haapasaari, P.
    Number of pages17
    Pages95-111
    Publication dateAug 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalEnvironmental Science & Policy
    Volume98
    ISSN (Print)1462-9011
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of Science1172 Environmental sciences (maritime governance, oil spills, offshore petroleum industry, risk frames, mental models, influence diagrams, knowledge production)
    Electronic versions
    DOIs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  3. Rhizobial inoculation improves drought tolerance, biomass and grain yields of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) at Halaba and Boricha in Southern Ethiopia

    While pulses are staple food-legumes in Ethiopia, their productivity is low due to low soil fertility. Elite rhizobial strains that significantly increased shoot dry weight and nitrogen (N) contents of common beans and soybeans in greenhouse were selected for two-year field trials to evaluate their effect on yields of the pulses in the field. Each pulse had six treatments, namely four rhizobial inoculants, uninoculated control, and synthetic N fertilizer. In the drought-affected year 2015, inoculated pulses tolerated moisture stress better than non-inoculated controls. Inoculation was conducive to higher or equivalent yields compared to synthetic N fertilizer. At Halaba, bean inoculated with strain HAMBI3562 gave the highest grain yield (1500 ± 81 kg ha−1; mean±SE) while the control yielded only 653 ± 22 kg ha−1. At Boricha, HAMBI3570 gave a grain yield (640 ± 35 kg ha−1) comparable to synthetic N. When rainfall was optimal in 2016, inoculation with HAMBI3562 and HAMBI3570 gave grain yields (around 4300 kg ha−1) equivalent to synthetic N. With soybean, strain HAMBI3513 produced consistently higher or comparable biomass and grain yields compared to synthetic N. In conclusion, HAMBI3562 and HAMBI3570 for beans and HAMBI3513 for soybeans can serve as inoculants for areas having similar conditions as the test areas.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsEcosystems and Environment Research Programme, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Department of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Agricultural Research Institute
    ContributorsAserse, A., Markos, D., Getachew, G., Lindström, K., Yli-Halla, M.
    Publication date5 Jun 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalArchives of Agronomy and Soil Science
    ISSN (Print)1476-3567
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of Science414 Agricultural biotechnology (rhizobia inoculants, Microbial biotechnology, Biological nitrogen fixation, pulses, drought, food security)
    DOIs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  4. Luontokosketus ehkäisee sairauksia

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeE1 Popularised article, newspaper article
    OrganisationsEcosystems and Environment Research Programme, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Nature-Based Solutions, Doctoral Programme in Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences, Doctoral Programme in Wildlife Biology
    ContributorsPuhakka, R., Roslund, M., Sinkkonen, A.
    Number of pages1
    PagesB15
    Publication date2 Jun 2019
    Peer-reviewedUnknown

    Publication information

    JournalEtelä-Suomen Sanomat
    ISSN (Print)0359-5056
    Original languageFinnish

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleGeneral public

  5. Evaluating complex relationships between ecological indicators and environmental factors in the Baltic Sea: A machine learning approach

    The state of marine ecosystems is increasingly evaluated using indicators. The indicator assessment results need to be understood in the context of the whole ecosystem in order to understand the key factors determining the status of these environmental components. Data available from the system’s different components are, however, often heterogeneous: they may represent different spatial and temporal scales, and different parameters can be measured with different accuracy. This makes it difficult to evaluate the relationship between these variables and status of the environment using indicators. We studied whether probabilistic, machine learning-based classifiers could provide for assessing the relationships between multiple environmental factors and ecological indicators. This paper demonstrates the use of Bayesian network classifiers (Tree-augmented Naive Bayes classifier, TAN as the specific case example), used together with structural learning from data and Entropy Minimization Discretization (IEMD) algorithm to study environment-indicator relationships within coastal fish communities in the Baltic Sea. By using two Baltic-wide indicators of coastal fish community status and a heterogeneous set of potentially influential natural and anthropogenic variables, we explore and discuss the potential of the approach. Given pre-defined cutting points for the indicators, such as the classification thresholds of the indicator, the method enables identifying relevant variables and estimating their relative importance. This information could be used in environmental management to demonstrate at which threshold value the state of an indicator is likely to respond to a pressure or a combination of pressures. In contrast to many other multivariate statistical methodologies, the presented approach can handle missing data as well as data of varying types, from fully quantitative to presence-absence, in the same analysis.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Creative adaptation to wicked socio-environmental disruptions (WISE STN), Fisheries and Environmental Management Group, Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    ContributorsLehikoinen, A. M., Olsson, J., Bergström, L., Bergstrom, U., Bryhn, A., Fredriksson, R., Uusitalo, L.
    Number of pages9
    Pages117-125
    Publication dateJun 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalEcological Indicators
    Volume2019
    Issue number101
    ISSN (Print)1470-160X
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of Science1172 Environmental sciences
    Electronic versions
    DOIs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  6. Incorporating landscape heterogeneity into multi-objective spatial planning improves biodiversity conservation of semi-natural grasslands

    Recent actions to mitigate biodiversity loss in agricultural environments appear insufficient despite the considerable efforts channeled via the European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy. One likely reason for this failure is the limited attention paid to the regional and landscape level ecological characteristics in farmland conservation planning. We demonstrate how to obtain conservation prioritization solutions that would address simultaneously three goals, including two landscape level targets: minimizing local habitat quality loss, maximizing habitat connectivity, and incorporating landscape heterogeneity. As these goals may be contradictory, we investigate the potential trade-offs between them. We used the Zonation prioritization tool to examine how our three goals could be implemented in the agricultural landscapes of southwest Finland. We used measures of (i) biodiversity value of grasslands, (ii) connectivity between grasslands, and (iii) landscape heterogeneity which comprised of (land cover type based) compositional heterogeneity and (field margin based) configurational heterogeneity. Integration of landscape heterogeneity measures and habitat connectivity resulted in some tradeoffs with local habitat quality, the most prominent observation being that landscape heterogeneity co-varied with grassland connectivity. Among the two landscape heterogeneity parameters, inclusion of compositional heterogeneity resulted in more clustered prioritization solutions than configurational heterogeneity, which had a spatially more balanced impact. Concordance among landscape scale factors implies high potential for reconstruction of a functioning network of semi-natural grasslands in areas under intensive agricultural use. Broader scale multi-objective planning approaches can thus importantly support targeting biodiversity conservation planning and mediating the implementation of Common Agricultural Policy objectives.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsFaculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE)
    ContributorsHarlio, A., Kuussaari, M., Heikkinen, R. K., Arponen, A.
    Number of pages8
    Pages37-44
    Publication dateJun 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalJournal for Nature Conservation
    Volume49
    ISSN (Print)1617-1381
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of Science1172 Environmental sciences, 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
    Electronic versions
    DOIs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  7. Integrated utilization of microalgae cultured in aquaculture wastewater: wastewater treatment and production of valuable fatty acids and tocopherols

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Food quality and safety: lipids, vitamins and other bioactive compounds, Department of Food and Nutrition, External Funding, Department of Food and Nutrition, Food Sciences, Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS), Ecosystem processes/ Jaana Bäck, Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR), Clewer Aquaculture, Lahti University of Applied Sciences
    ContributorsTossavainen, M., Lahti, K., Edelmann, M., Eskola, R., Lampi, A., Piironen, V., Korvonen, P., Ojala, A., Romantschuk, M.
    Number of pages11
    Pages1753-1763
    Publication dateJun 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalJournal of Applied Phycology
    Volume31
    Issue number3
    ISSN (Print)0921-8971
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of ScienceEuglena gracilis, Selenastrum, PUFA, RAS, Wastewater, Feed, NANNOCHLOROPSIS-OCULATA EUSTIGMATOPHYCEAE, SALMON SALMO-SALAR, VITAMIN-E, MARINE MICROALGAE, EUGLENA-GRACILIS, ALGAL BIOMASS, CHLORELLA SP, FRESH-WATER, GROWTH, BIOFUEL, 1172 Environmental sciences
    Electronic versions
    DOIs
    SourceWOS
    Source-ID000469393600023

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  8. Zoning and weighting in urban heat island vulnerability and risk mapping in Helsinki, Finland

    Climate change is likely to increase the risks related to heat waves in urban areas. We map spatial pattern of heat wave vulnerability and risk in the Helsinki metropolitan area in southern Finland. First, we assess differences that zoning, i.e., differences in spatial units of analysis, and weighting, i.e., weights given to indicators when constructing the index, cause in map production. Second, we evaluate how maps of consensus and certainty could pave the way for visualizing and assessing uncertainties in risk and vulnerability indices. For vulnerability, we use socioeconomic data using 5 different zoning options and 11 different weighting options. For risk, we add two extra layers to vulnerability maps: hazard map showing the spatial pattern of heat based on Landsat satellite images and exposure map showing the spatial pattern of population. We found that when different zoning options are used, the spatial pattern of vulnerability may differ dramatically. In risk maps, the differences between zoning options are smaller. Contrary to previous literature, differences in indicator weighting alter the final maps slightly. The consensus and certainty maps show their potential, e.g., in pointing out areas which may have both high risk/vulnerability and high certainty for risk/vulnerability. Finally, we discuss other possibilities in tackling the uncertainties in mapping and propose new avenues for research.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Urban and Regional Studies (Urbaria), Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Urban Environmental Policy, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    ContributorsRäsänen, A., Heikkinen, K., Piila, N., Juhola, S.
    Number of pages13
    Pages1481-1493
    Publication dateJun 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalRegional Environmental Change
    Volume19
    Issue number5
    ISSN (Print)1436-3798
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of ScienceADAPTIVE CAPACITY, AGRICULTURAL VULNERABILITY, AREAL UNIT PROBLEM, CLIMATE-CHANGE, Climate risk, Heat risk, INDICATORS, MORTALITY, Modifiable areal unit problem, SENSITIVITY-ANALYSIS, SOCIAL VULNERABILITY, TEMPERATURE, UNEMPLOYMENT, Urban, Urban heat island, Vulnerability, 1172 Environmental sciences
    Electronic versions
    DOIs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  9. Metabarcoding Insights Into the Trophic Behavior and Identity of Intertidal Benthic Foraminifera

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsEcosystems and Environment Research Programme, Aquatic Biogeochemistry Research Unit (ABRU), University of Stirling, Stirling, UK, Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Utrecht University, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ)
    ContributorsChronopoulou, M., Salonen, I., Bird, C., Reichart, G., Koho, K.
    Publication date28 May 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
    Volume10
    Article number in E-publication (not DOI)1169
    ISSN (Print)1664-302X
    Original languageEnglish

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

  10. HELSINKI HARVEST: Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on the Application of Scientific Methods in Archaeology

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeC2 Edited book
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Department of Cultures, Turun yliopisto
    ContributorsMannermaa, K. (ed.), Manninen, M. A. (ed.), Pesonen, P. A. P. (ed.), Seppänen, L. (ed.)
    Number of pages195
    Publication date27 May 2019

    Publication information

    Place of publicationHelsinki
    PublisherSuomen arkeologinen seura
    Volume7
    ISBN (Electronic)978-952-68453-5-7
    Original languageEnglish

    Publication series

    NameMonographs of the Archaeological Society of Finland
    PublisherThe Archaeological Society of Finland
    Volume7
    ISSN (Electronic)1799-8611
    Fields of Science615 History and Archaeology, 119 Other natural sciences
    URLs

    Research output: Book/ReportAnthology or special issueScientificpeer-review

  11. What makes urban greenspace unique – relationships between citizens’ perceptions on unique urban nature, biodiversity and environmental factors

    Maintaining urban greenspace is important for stimulating diverse human-nature interactions. Yet, which greenspace to prioritize for conservation under threat of urban densification is a major planning challenge. Besides ecological knowledge and objective use, people’s subjective perception or opinion of urban greenspace has been emphasized in assessing the conservation value of urban greenspace and guiding present-day urban planning. Better understanding on people’s perception of urban greenspace and its influencing factors are, therefore, needed. Here we employ a Public Participatory Geographic information System (PPGIS) survey on “unique urban nature” in the city of Helsinki to explore people’s perceived uniqueness (i.e., perceived conservation value) of urban forest patches. We use generalized linear modeling (GLM) and structural equation modeling (SEM) to estimate the relationship between this perceived uniqueness and measurable conservation factors, specifically four biodiversity indicators (BDIs) and seven environmental factors characterizing vegetation structure, landscape features and urban context of the forest patch. Results show that biodiversity has a strong positive impact on perceived uniqueness (PU), while environmental factors have variable impacts on PU, either directly or indirectly through their impacts on biodiversity. While the size and surrounding population density of an urban forest are positively correlated with both biodiversity and PU, its connectivity, surrounding constructed land-use, and canopy cover exhibit negative correlations with PU. Our results highlight the importance of biodiversity in affecting PU both as a direct influencing factor and as a mediator of the impact of environmental factors. We detected distinct effects of environmental factors (e.g., connectivity, canopy cover) on biodiversity and PU, implying different responses of biodiversity and PU to these factors, and a potential trade-off between biodiversity (natural conservation value) and people’s conservation value when managing urban forests.

    General information

    Publication statusPublished
    MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed
    OrganisationsHelsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS), Doctoral Programme in Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme, Helsinki Institute of Urban and Regional Studies (Urbaria), Green roofs and walls in urban areas, Doctoral Programme in Wildlife Biology, Urban Ecosystems
    ContributorsWang, Y., Kotze, J., Niemelä, J., Vierikko, K.
    Publication date20 May 2019
    Peer-reviewedYes

    Publication information

    JournalUrban Forestry & Urban Greening
    Volume42
    ISSN (Print)1618-8667
    Original languageEnglish
    Fields of Sciencecanopy cover, patch size, PPGIS, Structural Equation Modeling, urban forest, 1172 Environmental sciences, 4112 Forestry
    DOIs
    URLs
    SourceRIS
    Source-IDurn:4001B723CF3AC5496E8E46A486A9DE08

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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